What makes tanager eco-tours and heliconia bed & breakfast different from other tourism companies?

|Comments are Off

First of all, Tanager Tourism and Heliconia Turismo are run by two biologists. We have a lot of knowledge about tropical ecosystems and the plants and animals that constitute those eco-systems

Second, we did not build our bed and breakfast near a forest, but rather we planted a forest near our hotel. That is right, we bought 8 hectares of pasture and started to reforest that area with native plants. An area that formerly only hosted grass, cattle and cattle egrets is now home to mahogany trees, orchids, hummingbirds, toucans, tamandua’s and the occasional jaguarundi.

Our hotel is designed to decrease impact on the environment:

  • We harvest and store rainwater, which is then treated to make it fit for human consumption;
  • The hotel has wide verandas that provide shade and decrease our energy consumption
  • We have installed on demand water heaters
  • Most of our light fixtures have LED lights or CFL (compact Fluorescent lights)

 

Hotel Heliconia_

Third, for us, the communities around us are important. We try to build lasting relationships with local people and local associations and we outsource as much as we can.

  • We work with local fishermen and boat owners on our trips to Coiba and trips in the Golfo de Montijo. Our regular captain borrowed money from us to buy a fuel-efficient quiet engine and repaid that loan twice as fast as we asked for. He then borrowed money to build a new boat. Two other captains have also built new boats and/or bought better more fuel-efficient engines to provide us and others with tourism services.
  • During the turtle nesting season we convince our guests to visit the turtle protection association in Malena to see turtles nest and/or hatch. We take them there for free and ask guests to donate to the association.
  • We work with a community tourism association in Quebro (AAPEQ) that has built an elevated walkway in the mangrove and has kayaks to explore the mangrove ecosystem.
  • We are starting to work with households in Restingue, a remote village near Cerro Hoya, to take visitors to their beaches and forests.
  • We organise trips for the Panamanian chapter of the Audubon society to Coiba at a discount so they can study the birds on this island.
  • We organise pelagic birding trips at cost price to increase knowledge about little known species like wedge-tailed shearwaters and Nazca boobies.
  • We have supported several scientists who surveyed animals and plants in Cerro Hoya National Park.
  • We have organised language courses for staff and anyone who is interested in learning English. The English is given by a Panamanian married to an Englishmen.
  • We have organised and supported first aid courses (by the Panamanian Red Cross) for our staff and for other interested people. Among them were the ambulance drivers of the local health post.
  • We regularly attend meetings about tourism on Coiba and Veraguas and participate to try and improve tourism.
  • We have assisted the community with the construction and maintenance of the local gravity fed water system.
  • We have started a small reduce reuse and recycle programme with small workshop led by Isibel from Cultura Eco.
  • We have over the years collaborated with peace corps volunteers that were hosted in Malena, Quebro and Flores.

 

 

What makes tanager eco-tours and heliconia bed & breakfast different from other tourism companies?

|Comments are Off

First of all, Tanager Tourism and Heliconia Turismo are run by two biologists. We have a lot of knowledge about tropical ecosystems and the plants and animals that constitute those eco-systems

Second, we did not build our bed and breakfast near a forest, but rather we planted a forest near our hotel. That is right, we bought 8 hectares of pasture and started to reforest that area with native plants. An area that formerly only hosted grass, cattle and cattle egrets is now home to mahogany trees, orchids, hummingbirds, toucans, tamandua’s and the occasional jaguarundi.

Our hotel is designed to decrease impact on the environment:

  • We harvest and store rainwater, which is then treated to make it fit for human consumption;
  • The hotel has wide verandas that provide shade and decrease our energy consumption
  • We have installed on demand water heaters
  • Most of our light fixtures have LED lights or CFL (compact Fluorescent lights)

 

Hotel Heliconia_

Third, for us, the communities around us are important. We try to build lasting relationships with local people and local associations and we outsource as much as we can.

  • We work with local fishermen and boat owners on our trips to Coiba and trips in the Golfo de Montijo. Our regular captain borrowed money from us to buy a fuel-efficient quiet engine and repaid that loan twice as fast as we asked for. He then borrowed money to build a new boat. Two other captains have also built new boats and/or bought better more fuel-efficient engines to provide us and others with tourism services.
  • During the turtle nesting season we convince our guests to visit the turtle protection association in Malena to see turtles nest and/or hatch. We take them there for free and ask guests to donate to the association.
  • We work with a community tourism association in Quebro (AAPEQ) that has built an elevated walkway in the mangrove and has kayaks to explore the mangrove ecosystem.
  • We are starting to work with households in Restingue, a remote village near Cerro Hoya, to take visitors to their beaches and forests.
  • We organise trips for the Panamanian chapter of the Audubon society to Coiba at a discount so they can study the birds on this island.
  • We organise pelagic birding trips at cost price to increase knowledge about little known species like wedge-tailed shearwaters and Nazca boobies.
  • We have supported several scientists who surveyed animals and plants in Cerro Hoya National Park.
  • We have organised language courses for staff and anyone who is interested in learning English. The English is given by a Panamanian married to an Englishmen.
  • We have organised and supported first aid courses (by the Panamanian Red Cross) for our staff and for other interested people. Among them were the ambulance drivers of the local health post.
  • We regularly attend meetings about tourism on Coiba and Veraguas and participate to try and improve tourism.
  • We have assisted the community with the construction and maintenance of the local gravity fed water system.
  • We have started a small reduce reuse and recycle programme with small workshop led by Isibel from Cultura Eco.
  • We have over the years collaborated with peace corps volunteers that were hosted in Malena, Quebro and Flores.

 

 

Conoce el Centro de Capacitación Comunitario El Tucan

|Comments are Off

En la comunidad de Achiote, Costa Abajo de Colón, tranquila área rural panameña sin adulterar por el turismo, con importantes recursos Naturales y Culturales, está ubicado El Centro de Capacitación Comunitario y de Visitantes El Tucán, propiedad del Centro de Estudios y Acción Social Panameño (CEASPA) ONG panameña con 40 años de trabajos en el país.

Rodeado de Bosque, Aves, Naturaleza, Mariposas, comunidades rurales…. el Centro El Tucán brinda apoyo a las iniciativas comunitarias, a los grupos comunitarios formados o en formación, promueve el Ecoturismo de Bajo impacto involucrando a las comunidades del área de vecindad del Área Protegida San Lorenzo. Y desarrolla actividades de Educación Ambiental dirigidas a niños y adultos con el objetivo de Proteger y Conservar la Biodiversidad a través del Conocimiento y el Respeto.

tucan

El Centro El Tucán ofrece un cálido y amigable recibimiento, así como hospedaje a los visitantes del área en sus sencillas instalaciones, limpias y cuidadas. Habitaciones compartidas o privadas, cocina común, salón para talleres, que pueden usarse por visitantes individuales o grupos a través de una donación, con la que se contribuye directamente al funcionamiento de esta plataforma de gran utilidad para los moradores del área.

Con una ubicación estratégica para conocer el área, Camino de Achiote (Achiote Road) lugar imprescindible para Observadores de Aves y Naturaleza, comunidades rurales, Río Chagres, Parque Nacional San Lorenzo y monumento histórico Fuerte de San Lorenzo, Patrimonio de la Humanidad por la UNESCO, lago Gatún, Centro de Visitantes de Agua Clara, playas Costa Abajo…

El Centro El Tucán, además, organiza Giras, educativas/lúdicas, brinda información sobre el área, ofrece orientación a los visitantes según sus objetivos, cuenta con agradables jardines, rancho, sendero donde pasear y disfrutar de la avifauna, la flora y la tranquilidad del lugar. Alquiler de bicicletas entre otros servicios. Es un lugar donde reina la tranquilidad y se disfruta de la Naturaleza, no apto para los que buscan otro tipo de diversión.

Con gran experiencia en el manejo de grupos de estudiantes Nacionales e Internacionales, con fines exploratorios o trabajo social ayudando a las comunidades. Creadores de experiencias vivenciales muy especiales, al poner en contacto a los visitantes con las comunidades.

Información Centro El Tucán:

  • Abierto todos los días, Mañanas 9.00am a 1.00pm Tardes de 3.00pm a 6.30pm (atendemos a cualquier hora con aviso previo)

 Contacto

centroeltucan@gmail.com

+507 6091-3055

+507 6626-9790 (Whatsapp)

www.centroeltucan.org

Reglamento de la Fundación Panameña de Turismo Sostenible (APTSO)

|Comments are Off

no hunting panama

CAPÍTULO I / LA FUNDACION PANAMEÑA DE TURISMO SOSTENIBLE (APTSO).

ARTÍCULO 1.  La FUNDACION PANAMEÑA DE TURISMO SOSTENIBLE (APTSO), es una institución privada sin fines de lucro, independiente y de carácter científico y cultural, con personalidad jurídica propia, con patrimonio propio y derecho a administrarlo. Regida por las leyes panameñas que regulan las materias inherentes, conexas o relacionadas con los objetivos perseguidos por la Fundación. Dirigida por un grupo de profesionales talentosos de diversos campos y con un fuerte deseo de promover la sostenibilidad en Panamá a través del turismo.   El compromiso de APTSO es conjugar el desarrollo económico, con consideraciones de respeto hacia lo cultural, social y ambiental a través de las actividades turísticas sostenibles.

ARTÍCULO 2. LA FUNDACIÓN PANAMEÑA DE TURISMO SOSTENIBLE (APTSO) tiene como finalidad esencial el fomento del estudio y la conservación de la diversidad biológica y socio-cultural, así como la promoción de esquemas de desarrollo alternativo ecológicamente viable y  basado en actividades turísticas sostenibles como herramienta. La Fundación promoverá la generación y divulgación de la información científica necesaria para la elaboración de planes de desarrollo alternativos, favoreciendo las interacciones y sinergias entre comunidades locales, sector público, sector privado y organizaciones no gubernamentales y especialistas de turismo y áreas conexas a nivel regional, nacional y mundial. Premisas de la Fundación Panameña de Turismo Sostenible (APTSO):

  • Consolidar la propuesta institucional a nivel interno y externo así como desarrollar la gestión eficiente y eficaz de los recursos presupuestarios y operativos
  • Mejorar continuamente la eficacia del proceso de gestión de calidad
  • Comunicar en toda la organización la importancia de involucrar la calidad en todo lo que se gestiona.
  • Asegurar la disponibilidad de recursos para el cumplimiento de los proyectos conforme está previsto.

ARTÍCULO 3.  LAS PRINCIPALES ACTIVIDADES que desarrollará la FUNDACIÓN PANAMEÑA DE TURISMO SOSTENIBLE (APTSO), incluyendo y sin limitar, serán promover la conservación de los recursos naturales y culturales de Panamá, de la región y a nivel mundial a través del Turismo, por intermedio de:

  1.  Actividades conjuntas
  2.  Intercambio de información – creación de redes y clusters de trabajo
  3.  Promoción de buenas prácticas de turismo
  4.  Capacitación y educación
  5.  Desarrollo de Políticas de procedimientos
  6.  Acuerdos de trabajo con distintas ONG´s
  7.  Promoción de productos turísticos sostenibles reales
  8.  Desarrollos de proyectos pilotos – certificaciones sostenibles y directorio de turismo sostenible.
  9.  Reconocimiento de productos turísticos sostenibles innovadores

 

Para documento completo, por favor contactar a info@aptso.org

Observando Tortugas Marinas en Panamá

|Comments are Off

img_1378

Las Tortugas marinas son un recurso natural y un activo turístico en peligro de extensión. Les invitamos a que hagamos conciencia en los turistas que nos visitan, con nuestras comunidades y en nuestras empresas sobre la la importancia de protegerlas y juntos impulsemos esta guía de buenas prácticas.  Gracias a nuestros amigos de  la Asociación de Guías Naturalistas de Panamá por compartir algunas de las normas y elevar la profesión de guías.

De las 7 especies de tortugas marinas que encontramos en el mundo, 5 desovan en las costas panameñas.  Baula o Canal (Dermochelys coriácea), Leatehrback en el Caribe y Pacifíco, Cabezona o Cajuana (Caretta caretta) Loggerhead, Verde (Cehlonia mydas agassizili), Carey (Eretmochlys imbricata), Lora (Lepidochelys olivácea).

Normas de observación de arribo de Tortugas marinas:

1. Evite pisar los nidos cuando camine en una playa de reproducción.

2. No se monte encima de una tortuga.

3. No haga camping ni encienda fogatas o fume en playas de reproducción.

4. No deje obstáculos que eviten la animación de la hembra, o la incubación de los huevos, esto puede impedir la llegada al mar de las tortuguitas.

5. No arroje basuras en la playa ni en el mar. Recojálas en una bolsa y depósitelas en el lugar adecuado. Colabore con las labores de limpieza de la playa que realiza la comunidad, la empresa turística y los funcionarios de gobierno.

6.  Mantega a los perros y animales domésticos lejos de las playas de reproducción, ya que son un peligro para las hembras y sus huevos.  Evite las cabalgatas en la playa durante la temporada reproductiva.

7.  Evite la iluminación sobre la playa.  La luz artificial desorienta a las tortugas y sus crías.  Solo utilice linternas con luz roja.

8.  Acérquese a las tortugas desde atrás y acuclillado a una distancia máxima de cinco (5) metros.  No haga ruido ni movimientos bruscos.

9.  Use semipro ropa oscura para caminar de noche por las playas de animación y reduzca el uso de linterna y encendedores.

10.  No se acerque ni tome fotos con flash a una tortuga mientras asciende la playa o antes de empezar a depositar los hueves.  Una vez este desovando, entra en “trance” y en ese momento usted puede tomar fotos solo desde la parte de atrás y nunca directamente a la cara.  Reírse inmediatamente si el animal muestra señales de perturbación.

11.  Considere no permanecer más de 15 minutos en el sitio donde la tortuga esta desovando.

12.  Si no es asistido por un guía, suministre la información sobre su encuentro a las autoridades del parque o a los miembros de la comunidad.  Recuerde que usted suma y su colaboración es vital para la protección de estos hermosos animales.

13.  No manipular los huevos de las tortugas o colocar algún objeto extraño dentro del nido.  Esto puede introducir bacterias o lastimar los huevos.

14.  Evitar las fuentes de contaminación sónica (radios, grabadoras, etc.).

 

Red Rural de Turismo Sostenible de Panamá

|Comments are Off

 

La Red Sostenible de Turismo Rural (SOSTUR) te permite explorar lo mejor de Panamá y experimentar rutas alternativas al turismo convencional.  Descubre nuestra gente, su cultura y ten aventuras de la mano de guías locales en cada región.